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Build Your Photography Business: Blogging for Photographers

By Jen Gramm, Tru Vue® Director of Marketing

In previous posts, (Online Marketing for PhotographersHow to Market Your Online Photography Store), we’ve discussed setting your online marketing goals and how to market your online store. This post covers the next step in building your photography business, launching a blog.

 

 

Remember the Rod Stewart song “Every picture tells a story”? Sir Rod was correct: Pictures do tell a story, but they are only a piece of a story. To grow your photography business, you need to include words, and this is why having a blog for your photography business is so important.

 

 

For instance, imagine you’ve entered a room full of potential customers. You wouldn’t just whip out your portfolio and pass it around without saying anything; you’d present your portfolio, introduce yourself, and tell your story. Your blog should be your complete digital presentation, a way to connect with your customers and share who you are as a photographer.

 

 

Being able to share who you are is an important reason why a blog is an essential part of your marketing plan. With your blog, you can integrate your photography, stories, and experience into an effective and fun marketing tool. Share your personality, draw new and interested people to your website, and ultimately gain more customers.

 

 

Starting a blog may seem daunting, but these three tips can help you get started:

 

 

 

1. It’s Your Photography Blog – Make it Your Own

 

It’s probably a safe bet that you read one or more photography blogs. Take a good look at them and note what you like and don’t like. Then decide what aspects to include in your blog, and what your voice will be—informational, educational, funny… it’s up to you.

 

 

Landscape photographer Michael DeYoung’s blog is a great example to review. Michael shares terrific content showcasing his talents and personality. His blog includes amazing photos, “behind-the-scenes” shots, detailed technical information about his equipment choices, and has a conversational tone that makes the reader comfortable.

 

 

2. Determine Your Audience

 

The next important step is to determine your target audience. Do you write for potential customers interested in your creative process? Would they like tips on choosing amazing photography for their home or business? Or maybe you write for hobbyist photographers seeking information about the technical aspects of photography? Obviously, depending which of these groups you choose, your content will be very different.

 

 

If you already have a newsletter or social media following, take note of the posts or information that receives the most engagement. You probably get asked lots of questions by clients, family, and friends. If you’re just starting out, answer those questions in your posts. You can also write about the aspects of photography you enjoy most.

 

 

Once you’ve identified who you are writing for and what information might intrigue your audience, it is time to set your blog up.

 

 

 

3. Setting Up Your Photography Blog

 

Perhaps you’ve read about the nuts and bolts of setting up a blog and thought, “Ugh, I don’t want to learn all that!” I hear you, but it’s really not that daunting because there is TONS of useful information available to get you started and keep you on track.

 

 

Here are some basics:

 

  • There’s No Place Like Home – The best place for your blog home is on your website. There are many reasons for this, but mainly, you want your visitors to keep coming back to your site to see your spectacular photos and think of you as a resource.

 

  • How Often & When To Post – Establish a frequency you can manage and stick to. Your readers will learn quickly what the schedule is and will come to look forward to your updates.

 

  • Length – Make sure your post length is a minimum of 300 words so that search engines will recognize it. And don’t shy away from including your photographs.

 

  • The Science of Your Art – Think about what keywords relate to your posts and will help increase your SEO. If you think SEO stands for Sanitation Enforcement Officer or Sure Enough Otter (ok, I made that one up), you’re not alone. Simply, SEO stands for search engine optimization, and your blog keywords help search engines, like Google, find you and rank your information. Developing keywords is also helpful in determining the focus of your blog. This guide from Fuel Your Photos is an excellent start and will walk you through the process.

 

 

You’ve Built It, Now What?

 

When you first launch your blog don’t be surprised if it seems like you’re throwing a party for one or just a few – who may or may not be related to you.

 

 

It will take a bit of time to get traction and build a following. However, keep posting regularly and sharing on social media or in your newsletter, and your readership will grow, as will your online photography business.

 

 

Did you find this post to be helpful? SUBSCRIBE to our blog and stay tuned for more actionable tips, tricks, and best practices for online marketing of your photography business.

This article is intended for educational purposes only and does not replace independent professional judgment. Statements of fact and opinions expressed are those of the author(s) individually and, unless expressly stated to the contrary, are not the opinion or position of Tru Vue or its employees. Tru Vue does not endorse or approve, and assumes no responsibility for, the content, accuracy or completeness of the information presented.

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